Perfectly Pilgrim – The Values of the Pilgrim School


The importance of values within school organisations


A vision gives a sense of direction; the compass by which we navigate the school. 
The values of a school are what are used when you can’t see out of the ship. It is what you use when there is uncertainty in decision making. 
We are a disparate organisation. Individuals in this organisation have high levels of discretion. Therefore, values help us act in a similar way. It is the glue which binds the school together.


Sergiovanni describes in Strengthening the Heartbeat how to make vision and values useful. He argues that that for values to be effective, more than "mother and apple pie" statements, they require commitment and a signing up to them. In the best schools they draw up a charter of commitment – a statements of things they will commit to. The values outlined below were committed to by the school on an INSET day on 24th October 2014.


• Confidentiality
• Trust 
• Integrity
• Unconditional Positive Regard 
• Personal Responsibility 
• Academic Achievement 
• Autonomy 
• Resilience


Confidentiality:

This means that as professionals we understand our boundaries. The staff enjoy good working relationships with both pupils and each other. To help maintain these when deciding upon whether to share professional information staff need to answer these two questions: does the person I am sharing with need to know this information, and do I need permission to share this information?


Trust:

This is a key component of relationships and ways of working. To work effectively as a school we all need to be sure that we can trust each other to do the right thing (an element of competence) and the second relates to how we treat each other where there is vulnerability.


Integrity:

This is bound to trust but poses the key question of whether we do the right thing when nobody is watching you? Do we keep to our values and commitments when the only accountability might be from ourselves?


Unconditional Positive Regard:

As a school we believe in Carl Roger’s principle of self-actualization. We believe that all people have a natural tendency to create a good life for themselves. This is done through positive relationships, especially those which regard all humans as having worth and separates their actions and behaviours away from their value.


Personal Responsibility:

Staff and pupils do not work within an accountability culture. This means that we do not work to high standards because we are accountable to others, instead we work to high academic and professional standards because all members of the school community accept personal responsibility. Teachers are professionally responsible for the standards in their classroom; pupils accept responsibility for their learning and Reintegration and Support Officers accept responsibility for the pastoral care of their students. The standards we have are our own.


Academic Achievement:

We are a school. As a school we place a premium upon academic achievement. Pupils in the school will start with different prior levels of attainment, different needs and have different lengths of stay but we expect all pupils to make at least good progress in the time they have here. Doing well at school does not just help pupils for the future it makes them feel better and heal faster too.


Autonomy:

Staff and pupils in the school work in disparate circumstances. They will have high levels of autonomy and individual working.
Resilience: This is the most important value we have because it binds the other values together. We want our pupils to have a successful future and happy lives. To do this as a school we systematically and systemically build pupil resilience. This means we are mindful of planning for their “I am, I Have and I can needs”. A powerful resilience factor in itself is a successful school experience. Pupils with 5 A*-C grades are less likely to suffer from mental health and self harm than those without them. 

Latest News

Duke of Edinburgh - The start of a new Expedition for our Pupils.

The school is now registered for a licence to deliver the Duke of Edinburgh Award Scheme.  The DofE Manager will be DA and a pilot will be run at the Sleaford Base initially with approx. 4 – 5 of our current Y10 and below pupils.  Sessions will happen every week starting after Christmas to prepare them for their expedition.  If the pilot is successful we will roll out the award to other interested bases/pupils.

Save the Children - Christmas Jumper Day

 A Christmas Elf Dressed up for Jumper Day

Hi Everybody,

Today at Sleaford it was Christmas Jumper Day!!! Pupils and staff wore the jazziest, brightest, over the top jumpers I have ever seen and everybody got into the Christmas spirit in a big way. Donations for the Save The Children fund were greatly received. There were games lined up and prizes galore and everybody had such fun. Even the candidates for RSO interviews arrived looking very festive! We all had a fantastic day. 

Thanks everyone, from your cheeky Christmas DR  Elf

 Save the Children Christmas Jumper Day Logo

 

London Trip December 2017

On Wednesday 13th December this year, 16 students and 8 staff took a train to London. We walked two miles through London taking in the iconic sites along the river; the Houses of Parliament and Big Ben, The London Eye, St Paul’s Cathedral and the Shard. We walked over Waterloo Bridge to Covent Garden and down Drury Lane and Museum Street to The British Museum where we saw the Mummies of Ancient Egypt. We had lunch at the museum and then we went by taxis via Buckingham Palace to the Apollo Victoria Theatre to see a performance of the musical Wicked. We then jumped into more taxis to go back to Kings Cross Station, where we managed to fit in seeing the Harry Potter Platform 9 and three quarters before catching the train back to Lincolnshire. It was a full and tiring yet incredibly worthwhile day in terms of broadening horizons,  having new experiences, learning new skills, being sociable, building resilience and having fun!

All the best

JO

Btec Animal Care - Handling Day

 MillipedeHedgehogBearded Dragon

                                                                                                  

 On the 5th December, we had visitors of various reptile and small animal species. The animals included: a hedgehog, a millipede, a frog, tarantulas, a scorpion and a snake. An interesting thing I found out was that if you stroke a hedgehog, the spikes don’t prick you and it feels like a rough rug. Also the bearded dragon’s chin turns black when it starts to become angry. When I held the millipede, it tickled my hands and it wrapped its self around them.

By IL

Children In Need - Varied Activities & Pudsey Coin Fill

On Thursday 16th November,  our member of staff JD hosted a Children In Need Fundraiser morning in her Tutor Time. Students from Sleaford base took part in juggling, hoola hooping and covering Pudsey Bear in loose change that the students brought in. A big Thank You to a pupil BJ for bringing in a huge carrier bag full of 2p and 1p coins!

On Friday 17th students came to school in various costumes including two Pudsey Bears, One Pokemon character, a number of onesies and lots of spotty items.

Everyone had lots of fun and a number of staff from Sleaford base also got involved.